How to Create a Steering Committee

Steerting CommitteeThe goal of having a steering committee is a few things. Typically, they are comprised of each departments representatives, IT, Business, Digital Marketing, HR, Communications, Operations, etc.. and are responsible for reviewing the prioritized backlog list and determining the priorities for the sprint releases. Identifying members fore the steering committee is something your executive team will be able to provide guidance on as well if not have suggestions. This is also where requests from stakeholders can be submitted by the representatives and reviewed where it fits in the overall list of items. This takes the burden of responsibility off of you and your team of being the sole decision maker. When someone complains that their request isn’t being address you can simply state that you will bring it up to the steering committee for consideration and it will be prioritized in order of importance as it relates to the greater project as a whole.

Keeping the meeting notes and results of these meetings public will also be important to your transparent communications. Because if someone does escalate that their request isn’t being addressed you can simply point that individual to the updates and keep this included as part of your monthly executive updates. This will keep you well ahead of any objection or obstacle you might encounter as the collaboration transformation starts to take shape.

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Show Me the Money

There is a good chance that a compelling story won’t be enough to get you everything you need and if you have the data then you should be able to pull together the value of community engagement in order to establish a base line of opportunity. If you don’t have that don’t let it stop you! Getting funding for social business initiatives is never easy and until you can associate revenue to your initiative it is very hard to secure incremental investment to further your programs. Linking your social engagement activity to booked revenue in order to come up with a measurable ROI and justification is the best way to get the attention needed to have a funding conversation.

Welcome to the wonderful world of big data analytics. You don’t have to be a data scientist but knowing statistical information to back up your engagement strategy will work toward your advantage to secure executive support and funding.

In order to make this ROI association my team went through the exercise of pulling new community registrants for a given year then matched them to booked revenue over that same period.

 

“This information can be pulled from a users profile and or email domain extension in order to associate the user to their respective company. However, there will be a need to clean up the data excluding personal email domains like gmail and yahoo.”

 

Once this list is compiled, the average purchase price of those companies who had members in the community can be compared to those companies who did not have members. The data in this example concluded that customers with members in a community had an average purchase price 240% higher than those customers who were not engaged in the community.

This was all I needed to get the attention I needed and it wasn’t even the most compelling statistic. What we further determined was if we could increase the number of companies engaging in the community by just 1% we could increase revenue by $12M. But considering there were over 12,000 companies listed as customers that growth opportunity had the potential to be upwards of 2500%. Now we were talking Billions and those types of numbers catch executive’s attention.

 

5 Things a Digital Agency Can’t Do

I have the opportunity to work with quite a few digital marketing/creative design agencies over the years, some good and others not so much. Agencies are good with coming up with creative ideas, provide design concepts and proving an extension of your team but there some things they just can’t do.

Executive Support

An agency can’t help you get support from the executive team that can help secure funding and remove obstacles. They can pull together a pretty creative pitch but ultimately you need to be the one to pull together the support and be able to clearly communicate to the executive the strategy, the objective and impact. Getting executive support will ultimately lead to your success or failure.

Funding

An agency can pull together some elaborate plans but if you don’t have funding then what is the point. I have found over the years if you don’t pull together the strategy and help guide the agency you may end up with a plan that can’t be delivered. Funding for a project depends on your ability to be able to communicate that impact to the executive team if not present the ROI. In the case of rolling out an internal social intranet there wasn’t an ROI as much as the impact of transparent communication and collaboration was huge.

IT Resources and Infrastructure

Again, if you don’t help lay some reasonable expectations for an agency you may find yourself in a situation where you have great plans but no one to implement the infrastructure required. Building a cross collaboration team that includes your IT team, HR and keeping finance included will help improve your ability to deliver.

Communication

An agency will typically provide a project manager and can assist with team project updates but not overall executive or divisional communications. When you are building your team it will be important to keep your stakeholders close and well informed. You may need one or two team members that share this responsibility to ensure stakeholders are aware of the plan, status and more importantly how it benefits them. This will be critical to keeping objections and obstacles to a minimum. It also helps build a grassroots internal marketing awareness campaign through word of mouth and water cooler gossip.

Obstacles

With any project and more specifically when implementing disruptive marketing programs you will have obstacles. Besides the typical, finance, contracts, legal obstacles there is sure to be political obstacles that someone will raise. Politics usually arise when people who aren’t stakeholders, aren’t informed, aren’t educated but may be impacted by the project process. Keeping good transparent communication and some personal attention will help keep the team moving along.

One of the tactics I have used is keeping all project details open to the public so anyone can see what is occurring at anytime. It helps to have a communicate collaboration platform like Jive Software where you can post, manage and keep the team updated with a single portal.

Agencies can add value to any project but there ultimately needs to be a leader of the overall program to address and manage the above items that they can’t. And that leader is you.

I’ll be sharing more details about these topics at the Argyle Customer Care Executive Forum NYC Nov 5th. If you are interested in hearing more register via the link and I’ll see you there.

Executive Leadership Is Critical For Success

About a year ago I started outlining a book on community collaboration and digital marketing strategies. I started covering all the basics, SEO, content publishing, advocacy, social media and engagement etiquette. And I realized toward the end that most of my success implementing these strategies for companies was due to executive leadership. Any project starts with leadership to help get the support you need from executive sponsors to improve your teams chances at success. This may be the most important aspect of any rolling out any marketing engagement program for three reasons: Obtaining funding, removing obstacles, and team motivation.

First of all if you don’t have funding you don’t have a project. Securing commitment for funding reassures the team that there is support for there efforts. It provides the resources, new hires, products needed to get the ball rolling. Funding is also one of the bigger obstacles that will need to be addressed immediately but not the same as other obstacles you will face when rolling out a disruptive technology.

The other types of obstacles I am referring to are political. You would be surprised how many internally and externally want a voice but don’t want to help. You will find between finance, HR, global security, legal, IT… etc… there will be no shortage of departments that will want to slow things down by asking questions, throwing up barriers and all around objection to change. No one likes change but it is necessary if you want to evolve and survive in this new modern world of customer engagement. Getting a good representation of executives will help eliminate all these issues as you will have a trump card that you can call their bluff when threats of escalation. Recently when our team implemented a social intranet we had the CMO, SVP of HR and CTO as executive sponsors. This won’t prevent threats or obstacles from being presented but will give you the confidence that it won’t go any further and the project will continue moving forward with the strategy you have set forward.

And this helps team motivation. All any employee wants is to be able to complete their task and have success. Keeping a team motivated is really just this simple. If you, as the strategic leader, can secure the executive support to help remove obstacles and lay a foundation for the teams success that is all the motivation they will need. It is just the belief that success is possible and the team can do the work that they have been tasked with.

These are just three reasons why executive support and leadership is important but realize that this doesn’t explain how to get an executives attention, tactics that can be used to eliminate escalations and keep the team focused on the end result. I think I just came up with three new chapters. Stay tuned and I’ll try to put some of these down in future posts.

The Inside Story to Launching a Social Intranet: Part 2 – Resilience

It was everyone’s commitment to the project that got us to the actual cutover day. But it was our resilience and sense of purpose that helped us persevere the next three days that would prove to be the most difficult challenge we would face to date.

 

The Friday prior to launch, the database migration was on track and confidence was high we would be able to access the new Social Intranet production site on Saturday morning. And at 8am Saturday it was confirmed, the database migration had completed and we were ready to start our changes. By 7pm, we felt like we were at a good stopping and that the IT team could kick off the search index rebuild that would take approximately 16 hours. This is where the challenges began….

 

At 5:30am on Sunday, the search index process appeared to be hung at 97%. Rather than confirm with the vendor or project team, a unilateral decision was made to restart the service and start all over again. This was one of the first mistakes we made as a team and can’t help but think that a lack of sleep over the prior three days had something to do with it. Around 11am the search index was back up to 94% and the vendor confirmed this was typical as the process slows down the closer it gets to finishing and isn’t uncommon for several hours to pass between 97%, 98%, 99%… In hindsight if we had let the process continue, it would have been completed by this time. But, we pushed on realizing we couldn’t change anything at this point and we were well beyond the point of no return.

 

By 3pm that Sunday, It was time to get out of the command center, get some fresh air and new perspective on status and moral. It was a beautiful sunny day and we talked about how we felt and where we were in the upgrade process. Morale was surprisingly high. There was still more to do but everyone felt we were continuing to make progress and nothing that would prevent us from completing our goal. Most of the old intranet pages had been moved over, all 500+ communities had been updated with the new layout, widgets and template, home page content was being populated and the training space was all setup and ready to go.

 

It was 8pm on Sunday night and APAC offices were coming on line. We decided to split the team at that point so at least some of us could get some rest and were fresh in the morning when users began accessing the site. At that time, a member of the team made a statement that really caught us off guard. “I am seeing users beginning to access the system. Should I bring the other three nodes of the application cluster online?” We all just looked at each other and said, “Why are they down? Yes bring them online”

 

All the work we had been doing over the last 48 hours, including uploading images, formatting spaces and organizing content had all been completed against Node1 of the four-node cluster. So, when the site came up our beautiful baby turned into an ugly monster that was out of control. The nodes hadn’t been synchronized which resulted in missing images, broken links and an inconsistent experience. By the time we realized it, user questions started rolling in from the Australia offices. “Why can’t I access this link?”, “Why is the home page missing images?”. We fielded as many questions as possible and tried explain and use this as a test the experience and it was immediately clear it wasn’t good.

 

It is about midnight now and knew EMEA would be coming on-line in a few hours. The experience was terrible, the search index wasn’t complete and there wasn’t much we could do other than let process finish, cycle the servers, clear the cache and keep our fingers crossed. The site was a disaster and quickly realized we needed a maintenance page that would prevent users from accessing the site. This would also give the team a few hours of sleep and let the index process complete. The UX team said they could modify the entire theme with a maintenance message and would quickly test. We agreed and got to work.

 

By 1am, the maintenance theme was live. It wasn’t pretty but it would do the trick and we agreed to meet at 5am and reassess where we were. This was a critical point in our go live preparation. Everything depended on the search index process completing. Everyone was tired, mistakes were made but we still believed we could get through this and the reward of delivering the experience was still in sight.

 

Have you experienced any particular challenges where you persevered and resulted in a positive outcome?